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Bix September 14th, 2009 18:23 GMT Print this post
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This message was edited by Bix on September 14th, 2009 18:24 GMT

James, Hiromitsu Gompei was killed in the New Japan dojo in 1995.  He was an amateur wrestler whose parents were worried about him going pro, but Hiroshi Hase assured them that he'd be ok.  What's believed to have happened is that as they were finishing the daily workouts, Riki Choshu walked in and Gompei was ordered to start over so the booker could check out how he was doing.  Gompei was exhausted and screwing up the exercises, so Kensuke Sasaki (with Choshu) shoot suplexed Gompei on his head over and over...and then he died.  Hase was devastated and left the company after the January '96 Tokyo Dome show.

MMA fighter Takayuki Okada (Giant Ochiai) died in the World Japan (Choshu start-up group after he left New Japan) dojo during a workout with Kenzo Suzuki.  There's even less known about that, but Suzuki left Japan soon after, going to MLW, then to WWE, and then AAA in Mexico.  He worked some dates in Hustle and Dragon Gate back in Japan, but he's been mostly based in North America since the "training accident."
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JAMES BEARD September 14th, 2009 20:14 GMT Print this post
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Man Bix!  I had no idea.  

I can see exactly what you are talking about, though.  I have seen veterans put some young guys through different moves and holds to the point they could barely stand, much less continue in a manner that gave them a chance to do what they were being asked to do correctly.  It was a no win situation for the kids who were made to do that.  It doesn't make it any better or excuse it, but I'm glad to see those involved seem to have some sense of responsibility or "guilt" afterwards. The Choshu/Sasaki situation sounds inexcusable.

Accidents can and will happen in the ring, during matches or training, but there's really no excuse or reason for making kids continue when they are totally exhausted or sometimes, even injured.  it's dangerous and it's non-productive. They're not going to get it right in that situation anyway.


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JAMES BEARD September 14th, 2009 20:33 GMT Print this post
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Quoted from: Knight of Darkness, September 14th, 2009 17:31  GMT
What I don't like is when some wrestling schools will take a guy's money when the trainer knows after five minutes that the guy doesn't have what it takes.  Instead of being honest with the guy, they take his money and work him to death until he runs out of the building and they don't have to refund his money.

Some of these schools make their money not off of training wrestlers, but in breaking wannabes and taking their money.


That's exactly what I was talking about in my earlier post, Knight.  The problem is, most wrestling schools and wrestling instructors are semi-bogus to begin with and set up only to make money, not necessarily to really train young wrestlers the way they should be trained.

That's what I was talking about with our own school in Dallas.  Chris Adams and I ran the school, but truthfully, it was mostly a money-making operation.  We would typically have 7-15 students at a time and maybe 1-3 of them had any chance to ever work a match in a true professional situation, much less make a living in the business.  There were some good, honestly sincere kids who paid their money and we knew after 15 minutes, mpst of them had no chance to ever be a pro. Yet, they were kept on because they paid their fees.  

I hated that and hated being a part of it.  Chris was the head of the operation and by that time, he was dependent on this sort of thing to help make money. He was more interested in numbers than potential talent.  I can't say much, because I was involved as well, but I honestly never felt comfortable with the idea of taking on just anyone who could pay the tuition.  The only thing I can say in defense is that what we did teach and instruct was fundamentally sound and done in a professional way.  We made sure they learned very basic fundamentals of training before letting them get involved in actual wrestling maneuvers and holds.  But, the majority of those kids should never have been in the ring, regardless.  

Plus, at least Chris and I were professionals with experience and the background to teach. I can imagine what it would be like in a lot of these training centers where the instructors hardly know any more than the guys they are "teaching".
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Motley_Crue_Fan October 11th, 2009 00:18 GMT Print this post
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I have heard stories about guys who go to wrestling school with the sole intent of learning just enough to start their own schools! And James, the deaths at the New Japan dojo are covered in the Ring of Hell book, so if you want to learn more about them you can check it out.



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